I know what happens…

…to Harry Potter!  Of course I won’t spoil it for you.  Matt is reading as we speak.  He held down the fort literally all day Saturday so I could read book seven in its entirety.  It was kind of him to let me go first, no?  He was so anxious for me to finish, he didn’t let anyone bug me all day.  Plus he vacuumed — what a guy.  I have a feeling he might be a little less helpful now that he has his hands on the book…

So, when you find out what happens, let me know so we can talk!

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7)

Update:  The comments to this post may contain spoilers!  Don’t read the comments if you don’t know how the book ends.

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15 thoughts on “I know what happens…

  1. Andrea

    I am done too!! I loved, loved this book. I had the day off yesterday as well. Hubby even went out and got much lunch. Now he’s reading it and I want to read it again!

    Reply
  2. Trina

    I finished this morning too. (With a little help from the fact that I truly wasn’t well enough to go to church, although I’m sure it looks horribly suspicious!)

    Loved it, and can’t wait for hubby and daughter to finish so I can read it again! (I also can’t wait for them to finish so we can hash it over and I can triumph over a few correct guesses!)

    Reply
  3. Kjersten

    You are out of control! I can’t believe you already finished it, I am so jealous…got it midnight the day it went on sale, but just starting it now. So does this mean I can’t read your blog until I finish it because I CAN’T ruin the ending you know! ;0) kj

    Reply
  4. Andrew

    I got it at midnight on Friday from Wal-Mart and read most of the day on Saturday. I finished it on Sunday evening and now Robin is reading it too!

    I won’t give away any spoliers in this post because I think that it’s much more fun for people to discover it on their own, but I have to say I was totally satisfied with the way J.K. Rowling wrote this book. For one last time, we were able to visit many of the locations and remember the characters of the previous books. It was so nice to finally get closure on so many of the mysteries and secrets of the series with plenty of explanation, although I had to read a few parts a couple of times to make sure I got it.

    I look forward to chatting with you and Matt about it.

    Reply
  5. kira

    Aaron and I finished Sun. night at midnight…boy was it AWESOME!!! That JK…man she totally rocks! 7 great books – she deserves to be a filthy rich muggle!

    Reply
  6. Sarah

    Well, we’re all finished at our house. What do you think the appropriate age is for book 7? Can’t wait to hear what you thought. I’m feeling a little cynical right now!

    Reply
  7. liz Post author

    Well, now that you’ve all commented, I thought I’d share a few thoughts about this book. Sarah wondered about the appropriate age for this book. I’d say 11 or 12 (and yes, I noticed the bad words). I think most kids younger than that would struggle with the level of complexity of this book anyway. At our house, Sam, who is a strong reader at 9, has read the first four books, and number five has kind of slowed him up. Each book is increasingly complex and sophisticated, so the age level is not the same for this one, of course.

    As for me, I liked this book. I didn’t love, love, love it. For me, it was a little too action-packed. There weren’t many of those funny, sweet, adolescent moments and I missed them being at Hogwarts. All of the excitement kind of stressed me out, yet I found it a little predictable — it wasn’t the end of the book yet, so you knew Harry wasn’t going to die, and I didn’t think she’d kill off Ron or Hermione either. Also, though I appreciated the resolution, some aspects of the ending were just a little too cute for me — kind of like the Friends finale? Everyone just happy, happy, happy.

    She didn’t kill off anyone I cared about — we felt a little bad for Snape, but who really liked him anyway? The saddest moment involved the rat-like house elf. I would have been terribly irritated had Harry died, so was glad for that aspect of the ending. I actually didn’t think Voldemort should have died — maybe just his power stripped like at the beginning of the series. To me, if Harry is an everyman, it just doesn’t make sense that opposition has been stripped from his world.

    Overall, I expected to be more shocked, I guess. I don’t mean to be overly negative. I enjoyed this book very much, and I hope my children will enjoy reading all of these books as they grow up. They say this series’ popularity has done wonders for the literacy of both children and adults in this country, so huge kudos for J.K. for that — let’s read an adult book next, shall we?

    One thing Matt and I can’t figure out is how Neville got the sword at the end. Does anyone know?

    Reply
  8. Sarah

    Neville got the sword from the sorting hat at the end; when it caught fire on Neville’s head. I asked Doug how it got there since the goblin took it back, but he reminded that the sword belongs to all Gryffindors who need it! I didn’t remember this either, but Doug is a much more serious HP fan than I am. We also had to watch Bednobs and Broomsticks tonight to compare the various spells. There are some interesting coincidences!

    Also, I wasn’t even thinking of the language so much, except for the scene with mrs weasley and bellatrix, but also the torture scenes. Does that totally go over kids heads? Do they just not get it? I’m curious. Obviously Samuel’s too young to even start, but I just wonder how much he’ll understand.

    Reply
  9. liz Post author

    thanks Sarah. That sword thing was driving me crazy. I stil think an 11 or 12 year old can handle this book, torture and all, but they’ll have to tone down a few things for the movie. This could easily get an R rating, if they played it out to its gory potential, and I don’t think 17 and up is really the target audience for HP movies. I personally can handle reading a lot of things that I wouldn’t want to see on screen — anyone else?

    Reply
  10. Andrea

    I absolutely loved this book. If you remember my thoughts on movies, I love action packed things. I was a little nervous to buy this book because I knew once I read it, it would actually be over. I love how she tied everything together. I think she wanted the books to grow with the audience. She wasn’t going to write every book directed for the 11 year olds that were in the first one.
    I was very sad that Dobby died. His over the top support of Harry was something I think he really needed.I was also very sad that Fred died. I absolutely loved the twins, especially from the 5th book.
    This has to be my favorite book of hers.

    Reply
  11. robinbl

    OK, I can finally finish reading this post (I was only halfway through the book when I started reading it and had to close it rather abruptly). If you want to read my full thoughts on the book, I’ll post them on my blog. I did want to say that the reason for the similarities between the spells in HP and Bedknobs and Broomsticks is because most of Rowling’s spells (and a lot of character’s names) are based on Latin or Greek, which makes them sound elegantly ancient and profound. I have to agree that nobody who I really cared about was killed off, at least not in a way that I really felt sad about. I almost felt sorry for Fred having to die in such an unexciting, almost impersonal way. I felt the same about Remus and Tonks–they just died, another casualty on the list, not in battle against any particular death eater.

    Reply
  12. Andrew

    I also enjoyed this book very much, though I wished we could have had a school year as well. It would have been more fun to see Snape in action as headmaster, taunting Harry, etc. But I guess since Harry was “Undesirable Number One,” it wouldn’t make sense for him to be at the school.

    I was satisfied with Snape’s memories since I felt vindicated that he was indeed a “good guy.” However, I was somewhat disappointed in the way he died. Didn’t put up much of a fight… I thought for sure that he would give his life more dramatically in the fight against Voldemort. Oh well…

    Reply
  13. Emily Shaw

    when i first read your disclaimer i had to hurry and close the whole blog for fear that i’d sneak a peak and ruin it for myself … but i just finished it and i have to say – i cried through the last 10 or so pages. this is by far my favorite one and i am going to buy the boxed set in Sept. and reread the whole series now that it’s finished! what a GREAT job JK did and hooooray for writers who’s books will stand the test of time … i have a feeling these books are going to be popular for a VERY long time!

    Reply

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